Guidelines for Panelists

Guidelines for Panelists

 

Dear panelists,

Firstly, thank you very much for accepting our request to join the plenary sessions as panelists. I wish to share a few important points that will help you contribute as speakers.

Please note the following:

  1. Each panel discussion will have a moderator and about 4-5 panelists.
  2. Each panel discussion has been allotted 90 minutes.
  3. In the first 30 minutes, the moderator will introduce the panelists and ask a few questions relevant to their work and to the topic of the panel.
  4. In the remaining 60 minutes, the moderator will take questions from the general participants and will try and encourage an interactive discussion.
  5. A few key questions are mentioned below for each panel.
  6. As a panelist, you can bring a power point presentation but it is not necessary. You could also bring some images or short video clips as part of your presentation. However please note that in order to give time to all panelists and encourage audience participation, each presentation will be limited to 2 (two) minutes”

On 16 November 2018, Saturday

Plenary 1: Panel discussion – ‘Community radios against rising radicalism, extremisms, fundamentalism and intolerance:’

Moderator:

Ashish Chandra Sen, India

Panelists:

  1. Kyai Muhaimin, Indonesia
  2. Michael Philip Beltran, KADAMAY, Philippines
  3. Teeramon Buangam, ‘http://www.prachatham.com,’ Thailand
  4. Kim Chiaki, FMYY, Japan

Key premise:

It is evident from our own experiences and from the media that a climate of intolerance, extremism, radicalism and autocracy is in the rise. Such a climate has many forms and guises such as religion, economy, social behavior, etc. However, all of these have severe and unrelenting consequences on freedom of expression. Self-censorship across Asia-Pacific region is on the rise. The space for free media is shrinking. In the absence of free voice, atrocities against fundamental human rights, especially of dalits, women and other minorities is on the rise. This coupled with impunity has given rise to new kind of challenge to community media.

A few key questions that the moderate may ask:

  1. Do you experience cases of extremism and intolerance or radicalism in your community and country? How is it affecting freedom of expression and free media?
  2. What kind of activities do you implement to fight against rising intolerance?
  3. What kind of collaboration do you recommend with community radios to fight against injustice, intolerance and extremism?

Note: sub question may follow. The moderator may ask you questions specific to your country and about recent incidents.

 

On 17 November 2018, Saturday

Plenary 2: Panel discussion – “Challenging patriarchy and gender relationships”

Moderator:

Nimmi Chauhan, Representative, Women International Network, Asia-Pacific

Panelists:

  1. Al Faridah St. Infirohah, JRKI, Indonesia
  2. Mina Gurung, CR Marsyangdi, Nepal
  3. Pinky Chandran, Radio Active, India
  4. Mary Carling, Radyo Sagada, Philippines

Key premise:

While community media in general and specially community radios have long engaged with issues concerning women’s rights and their access to community media, the impact on the ground is far from satisfactory. It is time to re-think, re-evaluate, and re-vise our strategies. It is clear that mere scratching of the surface will not suffice. Core values and beliefs that promote and encourage atrocities against women – directly and indirectly – need to be challenged. Community radios with their presence at the grassroots need to lead this war against oppression as the first in the line.  In this session, the moderator will ask the panelists about any ground breaking work that they may be carrying out and also try to generate suggestions on the way forward!

 

A few key questions that the moderate may ask:

  1. Tell us about three kinds of worst atrocities that are carried out against women in your community and country. These could be trafficking, child marriage, VAW, etc.
  2. Could you share one or two examples of activities by your community radio that you feel have been more effective than others in inspiring women in your community?
  3. What in your opinion is the biggest threat or challenge in challenging the patriarchal mindset in your community?
  4. Give one or two examples of works that you carry out in encouraging women in your communities to have more and more access to your community radio. What works and what do not?
  5. What needs to be done to make men become more supportive towards justice and equality?

On 17 November 2018, Saturday

Plenary 3: Panel discussion on ‘Migration and internal displacements and challenges for community broadcasting’.

Moderator: 

Shima Roy, Health Communication consultant, Singapore

Panelists:

  1. Anak Agung Istri Diah Tricesaria (Didi), (until recently) Jesuit Refugee Service, Indonesia
  2. Katsuya Soda, Nanmin Now! Japan
  3. Prexazo Ximenes, ARKTL, Timor Leste
  4. Syed Tarikul Islam, CR Naf 99.2 FM, Bangladesh

Basic premise:

The number of those forcefully displaced from their homes — due to war or climatic conditions is in the rise across the world and in our region too. Displacement completely changes the dynamics of traditional communities and societies. Old links are broken. If community broadcasting is about giving voice to the voiceless then it is time that we make effort to understand the ground situation regarding migration and adjust our operations as a community radio accordingly. It’s hard to find anyone more voiceless than those that are on the run to protect themselves and their loved ones, while the forces of politics, religion, environment and military try to crush them. In this context, the panel will try to put together a picture of the ground conditions as well as the forces in place and discuss how grassroots media can address these. The objective is to find how community radios can help improve the conditions form those that have been displaced, irrespective of their nationalities, religion, race, color or gender.

Possible question:

  1. Each panelist will be asked to speak about specific migrant issues that are prevalent in their work areas.
  2. Those working in community radios (Katsuya, Prexado and Syed) will be asked about specific activities (such as consultations with the effected communities, program production and broadcasting) they carry out with and/or on behalf of the displaced?
  3. What are the good practices and what does not work?
  4. What are the main challenges in working with migrant communities and how can those be resolved – such as problems arising out of differences in language, culture, religion, etc.

 

On 18 November 2018, Saturday

“Plenary 4: Panel discussion – ‘Policy, Regulation and Media Laws and impacts on community radios”

Moderator:

Ramnath Bhat, President, AMARC Asia-Pacific, India.

Panelists:

  1. Ilang-Ilang Quijano, AlterMidya- People’s Alternative Media Network, Philippines
  2. Imam Prakoso, AMARC Asia-Pacific, Indonesia
  3. Tomoko Kanayama, IAMAS (Institute of Advanced Media Arts and Sciences), Japan
  4. Subas Khatiwada, President, Association of Community Radio Broadcasters, ACORAB Nepal
  5. Supinya Klangnarong, Thailand,

Rationale:

This panel discussion is aimed at taking stock of the ground situation vis-a-vis national media policies and the impact on the growth of community radio. The discussion will basically look at two aspects:

The key challenges being confronted regarding media policy at the country levels?

What has worked in terms of advocacy and lobbying?

What activities for lobbying could be carried out at sub regional (such as South Asia-SAARC, SEA-ASEAN, etc.) can be carried out?

 

On 18 November 2018, Saturday

 “Plenary 5: Panel discussion – ‘Emergency broadcasting for disaster management”

Moderator:

Mario Anton Birowo, PhD., UAJY;

Panelists:

  1. AHM Bazlur Rahman, BNNRC, Bangladesh
  2. Sinam M Sutarno, President, JRKI representative, Indonesia
  3. Junichi Hibino, FMYY, Japan
  4. Laxman Khadka, Chairman, Hamro FM, Nepal
  5. Robert G. Hopkins, OpenBroadcaster, Canada

Main premise:

Community radios have proven their worth as effective tools of disaster risk reduction time and over. The value of community broadcasting as an early warning system and for disaster management has been established beyond doubt. This panel represents expertise with a common focus – using community radio for disaster management. At the same time, the panel also represents a huge diversity in terms of socio-cultural-economic conditions as well as under geographical and climatic situations. There can be much learning across the diversity. Learning can be drawn from our unique experiences as well as the mistakes that have been committed. Therefore, this panel discussion has two specific goals:

 

  • To review the various ways in which community radio has been put to use for saving lives and livelihoods of those living under vulnerable conditions;
  • To review how community radios have been used in post disaster conditions;
  • To identify good practices and a list of dos and don’ts for community radios to be become more effective for disaster risk reduction.

Possible questions:

  • Share with us one or two examples of how community radios have saved lives or protected livelihoods of people living in vulnerable conditions in relation to natural disasters;
  • What in your opinion are the most critical factors that can make or break a community radio’s capacity to serve as a disaster risk reduction tool? What are the main challenges for community radios in becoming highly affective for DRR? Is it people’s participation or funds or preparations or absence of mapping of vulnerabilities in our communities?
  • In the existing structure of community radios – given that we function with very little resource, often relying of donor’s funds and never having adequate finances to prepare in advance, what can community radios do to improve their own resilience against disasters?
  • What are the specific linkages between a country’s media policy and its community radio sectors’ ability to function as a DRR tool? (Referring to frequency allocation, convergence of media, collaboration with other forms of telecommunication, possibility of procuring extra equipment such as a portable transmitter, etc.)
  • We have often discussed and acted upon advance preparation of content, policy advocacy, improved technology and so on. What is the next big leap that community radios need to make to serve people well, especially those that are located in vulnerable conditions?

 

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